Archive

Archive

2004–06

This is an archive of previous works that investigates processes of technological mediation and abstraction on human bodies. The works attend to the styles and methods in which these technological processes reconfigure the human sensorium and its meaning-making capacities, considering technological transformations in being, thinking, dreaming, sex acts, desire, despair, longing, violence, and death.

video mummy

2004

Blank videotape covers a mannequin. The sculpture responds to medial impacts on human form and the shapes of our media bodies. video mummy is the undead of information culture.

life pulses

2004

A camera is pointed at a blank analog video monitor and detects the cathrode-ray scanning process, an act typically not perceivable during television spectatorship. Similar to medical equipment that reveals biometric information on bodies, such as heart rate or temperature, the camera exposes the “life pulses” of the monitor.

push the red button

2006

Wikipedia defines the “big red button” as a device used to launch nuclear weapons. It also refers to an authority figure as “having his/her finger on the button” and notes that the red button is symbolic for “self-destruct.” push the red button is an interactive installation that examines collective meanings of technological control, ideology, and mass destruction. Participants are presented with a large, illuminated red button, emblematic of such big red buttons of control or destruction. When pressed, the button retrieves a phrase from a Google search on “push the red button,” “push my red button,” or “the red button.” While the participant is placed within the realm of the authority figure by pushing the red button, they are simultaneously denied the ability to have control of this act because the Google search is randomly displayed. Confronted with war, control, freedom, and sexuality, participants are left to question the ubiquity of pushing the red button in cultural imaginaries.

photocopies

2004

Nine photographs of mannequin parts are photocopied, beginning with an original and continuing by photocopying a copy of a copy of a copy. Each photograph is copied nine times, resulting in 81 photocopies. As the image is continuously photocopied, it reaches a tone stability; some body parts disappear quickly into black while others remain in abstract globs of white. photocopies asks where is the body in the image when technological mediation appears to have disappeared the figure. Why do some body parts remain visible, while others are erased?

Hole(s) of Non-Teleology

2006

Hole(s) of Non-Teleology is an interactive video installation that examines video feedback and the queer act of anal fisting. Live video feedback is set up in a space and projected onto a wall. Based on the number of participants listening with the installed headphones, the video feedback projection becomes interrupted with video of anal fisting and audio feedback. The piece oscillates from a technological abstraction of queer sexuality to a “group sex act” between installation and participants. Hole(s) of Non-Teleology poses the possibilities of a queer technology, suggesting that a formal and technical relation exists between video feedback and anal fisting.

tv pillow

2004

Video static is projected onto a pillow. Where a head would rest, there is now scrambled, empty signals of information transmission. tv pillow awaits the head that will sleep on it, filling its frenetic signals with thoughts and dreams.

the operation

2004

A mannequin is split in two and surrounded by a series of probing cameras and television monitors. The mannequin, itself an abstraction of the human body, is undergoing a medial operation or examination. While the mannequin is typically thought of as a rendition of the outer surface of the human, the operation records, or extracts, the “insides” of the mannequin and presents this on a series of monitors, giving the mannequin’s newfound depth a new surface, which is the video monitor.